Project – Doodle Days Lap Quilt

By Cindy Staub

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Growing up I had two favorite blankets, grandma’s green and white chenille quilt and an overall quilted purple flowered blanket that my mom had. Both were used as bedspreads and they were yummy, cozy blankets. The perfect coziness for reading or taking a nap. Well, I thought it would be perfect to combine these two things into a wonderful lap quilt. This project was way out of the box for me and I really felt like I went out on a limb putting this quilt together. Let me tell you, I broke a few quilting rules and this project will feel like you are doing some steps out of order, but I promise it will all work out in the end. I promise!

I saw this project as a great opportunity to work on my free motion quilting. The base of this quilt is a quilted ‘wholecloth’ base that is embellished with chenille strips. It’s actually an easy technique. It took me a full weekend to complete it, but that included a few diet coke breaks.

Materials

2 yards extra wide cotton fabric (110” wide) front and back of the quilt.

3- 1 yard pieces Primo Plaid Flannel in three different coordinating colors

½ yard cotton fabric – binding

Aurifil 50/2 thread

Twin size cotton batting

OLFA 45mm Splash Rotary Cutter

OLFA 24” x 36” Self Healing Rotary Mat

OLFA 6” x 24” Acrylic Ruler

OLFA applique scissor

Sewing machine

Safety Pins

Water soluble (washable) marker

 

From binding fabric cut 7 – 2” strips x w of, set aside.

Cut the back piece in half lengthwise to form 2 – 55” x 72” rectangles. Make a quilt sandwich by layering backing, batting and quilt front. Pin the quilt. I used safety pins to pin the quilt for free motion quilting. This is where you can have some fun with your quilting. You could even longarm quilt it too if you prefer.

I quilted an overall flower design.

I enjoyed free motion quilting the entire quilt at this point. I popped in an audio book and quilted away.

When you are done quilting, square up the edges and corners using your rotary cutter, mat and ruler.

Layer the three 1 yard flannel sheets together all right side up. Square up to measure a 36” square. Pin the layers well to hold everything in place on a flat surface.

With a fabric pen or chalk, mark a diagonal line, corner to corner. This will be your first stitching line.

Sew diagonal lines thru all three layers of fabric every ¾” until the entire flannel fabric sheet is covered. To minimize fabric shifting, use an even feet foot on your sewing machine.

Using your rotary cutter, ruler and mat, cut the chenille strips apart. (They should measure approximately ¾” wide with a sewing seam down the center of the strip).

You will have a big pile of strips.

Let’s break some quilt rules! Here comes the fun part. Lay your whole quilt out on a large table, or floor. You will treat this big white quilt like a big sheet of paper. Using a water soluble marker, draw a large flower design onto your quilt.

If you want you can follow the design layout from the quilt I made.

Remember, keep your design large, this will make sewing the chenille strips onto the quilt so much easier.

Using your drawn lines as a guide, line up the sewing line on the chenille strip over this line and sew through all the layers using an even feed foot on your sewing machine sewing on the stitching on the chenille strip.

Ease your strips around corners sewing on the same sewing line that is on the chenille strip. When you come to the end of a drawn line, clip your chenille strip and move onto the next line.

If you ‘run out’ of chenille strip, just butt the next strip in while you stitch along, overlapping it slightly.

Once you are done sewing on all of your chenille design, it’s now time to bind your quilt. Sew the 2 ¼” strips together end to end. Fold in half lengthwise and iron. Sew the biding to the top of your quilt using a ¼” seam, miter corners.

Then grab yourself your favorite comfy chair and diet coke. Put on your favorite show on Netflix and hand stitch your binding to the back of your quilt..

 

After your quilt is bound, throw it in the washer and dryer with normal settings to fluff up the chenille. I was super nervous about washing it with the white background. But I threw all caution to the wind and washed it. Be brave!

 

The more this quilt is washed and dried, the softer the chenille will become. I just love the crinkly softness of this quilt. It has the perfect comfy softness and reminds me of grandma’s chenille bedspread and mom’s floral whole quilt. This quilt is definitely coming to the cabin with me. It’s going to be perfect for those chilly nights when I want to curl up and do some reading.

 

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